A concentrated water and alcohol extract of an herb, typically in ratios of 1:1 or 1:2 (of dry weight to menstruum). A fluid extract is made by simmering an herb and reducing amount of water till the solution thickens. The resulting liquid contains a concentrated form of the herb’s active constituents. Glycerin, alcohol or tincture of Benzoin are often added as a preservative.

References

  1. Absorption and tissue distribution of curcumin in rats
  2. Ann McIntyre (1995), The Complete Women’s Herbal
  3. David Hoffman (2013), Holistic Herbal: A Safe and Practical Guide to Making and Using Herbal Remedies
  4. Experimental Cardiology Journal: Fibrinolytic effects of Ginkgo biloba extract
  5. Naturalpedia: Fibrinolytic Activity
  6. Japanese Heart Journal: Onion, garlic, and experimental atherosclerosis
  7. Journal of Postgraduate Medicine: Effect of ingestion of raw garlic on serum cholesterol level, clotting time and fibrinolytic activity in normal subjects
  8. Rosemary Gladstar (2014), Herbs for Common Ailments: How to Make and Use Herbal Remedies for Home Health Care
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